2018 Federal Standard Deduction   

 

The tax law that was passed by Congress and signed into law by President Trump on December 22, 2017 called the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (H.R. 1) made changes to the standard deduction. Below is the UPDATED information.

 

Table 1 - Standard Deduction for Taxpayers Who Are:

a. UNDER age 65,
b. NOT blind, AND
c. CANNOT be claimed as a dependent on another person's tax return

Filing Status Deduction Amount
Single $12,000
Head of Household $18,000
Married Filing Separately $12,000*
Married Filing Jointly
or Qualifying Widow(er)
$24,000

* If your spouse itemizes deductions AND also uses the married filing separately filing status, you CANNOT claim the standard deduction. You MUST also itemize deductions!




Table 2 - Standard Deduction for Taxpayers Who Are:

a. Age 65 or Over, and/or
b. Blind, and
c. CANNOT be claimed as a dependent on another person's tax return

Filing Status Age 65 or Over
OR Blind
Age 65 or Over
AND Blind
Single $13,600 $15,200
Head of Household $19,600 $21,200
Married Filing Separately $13,300* $14,600*
Married Filing Jointly
or Qualifying Widow(er)
Step 1: $24,000 + $1,300 for EACH spouse age 65 or older.
Step 2: Add an additional $1,300 for EACH blind spouse to the amount calculated in Step 1.

* If your spouse itemizes deductions AND also uses the married filing separately filing status, you CANNOT claim the standard deduction. You MUST also itemize deductions!




Table 3 - Standard Deduction for Dependents

The GREATER of:
  • $1,050

OR

  • The dependent's earned income (from work) + $350, NOT to exceed the standard deduction shown for dependent's filing status in:

  • Table 1 if dependent is UNDER age 65, OR

  • Table 2 if dependent is age 65 or over and/or blind